Changdeok Palace
Introduction
Changdeok Palace has kept its original figure. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage site.
King Taejong started to build this Palace in 1405, early in Joseon Dynasty. It lasted for505 years, from 1405 to 1910. The palace was destroyed during the Japanese invasion (1592-1598), and the repair was completed in 1610. After that, it was king’s main residence for about 300 years.
Changdeok Palace and its garden were built in harmony with nature. It was built to get on with the hills and streams in the area although it was traditional way to build the palace from south to north. Its stepped gardens channel the power of the mountains behind it into the palace.
Donhwamun
Donhwamun is the east palace gate, which was built in 1412. It’s the oldest remaining gate among the five major palaces in Seoul. It’s the two-story pavilion, which makes it the largest palace gate. A nine-ton bell was hung with a huge drum on the second floor of it. The drum was strung 33 times at 4am, and at 10pm the bell rung 28 times.
Chinese Scholar Tree
Following the legend of China, people planted three Chinese scholar trees in the palace. They symbolized the Korean top officials. People believed these trees would protect the palace against evil spirits.
Injeongjeon
Injeongjeon is the throne hall. It is the main hall where the formal events like coronation were held. Also here was the place kings received foreign visitors.
Seonjeongjeon
This is the building where the king spent most of his time doing his daily work.  Also, it’s the only building with the blue-tiled roof, which was much more expensive than others. Some important events like funerals were held here.
Huijeongdang
Huijeongdang was the king’s sleeping chamber. He did some works here.
Daejojeon
Daejojeon was the queen’s sleeping chamber. In some ways, the queen’s residence was more important than the king’s because she had to stay there all the time. Therefore, Daejojeon was built very beautiful.
The buildings of Huijeongdang and Daejojeon we can see these days are not the original ones. After the original buildings were burned in 1917, Japanese moved Kyotaejeon and Kangnyeongjeon from Gyeongbok Palace. And then they assembled it. In the process, the inner part was changed into western style.
Seongjeonggak
The Seongjeonggak area was the main palace for Crown Prince Hyomyeong the son of King Sunjo.  It’s a six-sided pavilion and had a large collection of books. Japanese used this building as a hospital during their occupation (in the 20th century).
Seonwonjeon
This is the area where religious ceremonies were held. The portraits of former kings were enshrined and some ancestral rites were performed here.
Nakseonjae
Nakseonjae is the complex of three buildings built by King Heonjong in1847. The buildings include the king’s dwelling, a library, a villa for his concubine Lady Kim, and a residence for the Queen mother. The king built them to show his love for art and Lady Kim.
Seokbokheon
IT was built in hope for a son.(But King Heonjong never had a son)

Written, picture by Isabelle of KCC.

※ KCC is the club which is made to introduce foreigners about Korea and its culture.Twitter Facebook Page Facebook account

Changdeok Palace

Introduction

Changdeok Palace has kept its original figure. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage site.

King Taejong started to build this Palace in 1405, early in Joseon Dynasty. It lasted for505 years, from 1405 to 1910. The palace was destroyed during the Japanese invasion (1592-1598), and the repair was completed in 1610. After that, it was king’s main residence for about 300 years.

Changdeok Palace and its garden were built in harmony with nature. It was built to get on with the hills and streams in the area although it was traditional way to build the palace from south to north. Its stepped gardens channel the power of the mountains behind it into the palace.

Donhwamun

Donhwamun is the east palace gate, which was built in 1412. It’s the oldest remaining gate among the five major palaces in Seoul. It’s the two-story pavilion, which makes it the largest palace gate. A nine-ton bell was hung with a huge drum on the second floor of it. The drum was strung 33 times at 4am, and at 10pm the bell rung 28 times.

Chinese Scholar Tree

Following the legend of China, people planted three Chinese scholar trees in the palace. They symbolized the Korean top officials. People believed these trees would protect the palace against evil spirits.

Injeongjeon

Injeongjeon is the throne hall. It is the main hall where the formal events like coronation were held. Also here was the place kings received foreign visitors.

Seonjeongjeon

This is the building where the king spent most of his time doing his daily work.  Also, it’s the only building with the blue-tiled roof, which was much more expensive than others. Some important events like funerals were held here.

Huijeongdang

Huijeongdang was the king’s sleeping chamber. He did some works here.

Daejojeon

Daejojeon was the queen’s sleeping chamber. In some ways, the queen’s residence was more important than the king’s because she had to stay there all the time. Therefore, Daejojeon was built very beautiful.

The buildings of Huijeongdang and Daejojeon we can see these days are not the original ones. After the original buildings were burned in 1917, Japanese moved Kyotaejeon and Kangnyeongjeon from Gyeongbok Palace. And then they assembled it. In the process, the inner part was changed into western style.

Seongjeonggak

The Seongjeonggak area was the main palace for Crown Prince Hyomyeong the son of King Sunjo.  It’s a six-sided pavilion and had a large collection of books. Japanese used this building as a hospital during their occupation (in the 20th century).

Seonwonjeon

This is the area where religious ceremonies were held. The portraits of former kings were enshrined and some ancestral rites were performed here.

Nakseonjae

Nakseonjae is the complex of three buildings built by King Heonjong in1847. The buildings include the king’s dwelling, a library, a villa for his concubine Lady Kim, and a residence for the Queen mother. The king built them to show his love for art and Lady Kim.

Seokbokheon

IT was built in hope for a son.(But King Heonjong never had a son)



Written, picture by Isabelle of KCC.



※ KCC is the club which is made to introduce foreigners about Korea and its culture.Twitter Facebook Page Facebook account

Changdeok Palace
Introduction
Changdeok Palace has kept its original figure. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage site.
King Taejong started to build this Palace in 1405, early in Joseon Dynasty. It lasted for505 years, from 1405 to 1910. The palace was destroyed during the Japanese invasion (1592-1598), and the repair was completed in 1610. After that, it was king’s main residence for about 300 years.
Changdeok Palace and its garden were built in harmony with nature. It was built to get on with the hills and streams in the area although it was traditional way to build the palace from south to north. Its stepped gardens channel the power of the mountains behind it into the palace.
Donhwamun
Donhwamun is the east palace gate, which was built in 1412. It’s the oldest remaining gate among the five major palaces in Seoul. It’s the two-story pavilion, which makes it the largest palace gate. A nine-ton bell was hung with a huge drum on the second floor of it. The drum was strung 33 times at 4am, and at 10pm the bell rung 28 times.
Chinese Scholar Tree
Following the legend of China, people planted three Chinese scholar trees in the palace. They symbolized the Korean top officials. People believed these trees would protect the palace against evil spirits.
Injeongjeon
Injeongjeon is the throne hall. It is the main hall where the formal events like coronation were held. Also here was the place kings received foreign visitors.
Seonjeongjeon
This is the building where the king spent most of his time doing his daily work.  Also, it’s the only building with the blue-tiled roof, which was much more expensive than others. Some important events like funerals were held here.
Huijeongdang
Huijeongdang was the king’s sleeping chamber. He did some works here.
Daejojeon
Daejojeon was the queen’s sleeping chamber. In some ways, the queen’s residence was more important than the king’s because she had to stay there all the time. Therefore, Daejojeon was built very beautiful.
The buildings of Huijeongdang and Daejojeon we can see these days are not the original ones. After the original buildings were burned in 1917, Japanese moved Kyotaejeon and Kangnyeongjeon from Gyeongbok Palace. And then they assembled it. In the process, the inner part was changed into western style.
Seongjeonggak
The Seongjeonggak area was the main palace for Crown Prince Hyomyeong the son of King Sunjo.  It’s a six-sided pavilion and had a large collection of books. Japanese used this building as a hospital during their occupation (in the 20th century).
Seonwonjeon
This is the area where religious ceremonies were held. The portraits of former kings were enshrined and some ancestral rites were performed here.
Nakseonjae
Nakseonjae is the complex of three buildings built by King Heonjong in1847. The buildings include the king’s dwelling, a library, a villa for his concubine Lady Kim, and a residence for the Queen mother. The king built them to show his love for art and Lady Kim.
Seokbokheon
IT was built in hope for a son.(But King Heonjong never had a son)

Written, picture by Isabelle of KCC.

※ KCC is the club which is made to introduce foreigners about Korea and its culture.Twitter Facebook Page Facebook account

Changdeok Palace

Introduction

Changdeok Palace has kept its original figure. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage site.

King Taejong started to build this Palace in 1405, early in Joseon Dynasty. It lasted for505 years, from 1405 to 1910. The palace was destroyed during the Japanese invasion (1592-1598), and the repair was completed in 1610. After that, it was king’s main residence for about 300 years.

Changdeok Palace and its garden were built in harmony with nature. It was built to get on with the hills and streams in the area although it was traditional way to build the palace from south to north. Its stepped gardens channel the power of the mountains behind it into the palace.

Donhwamun

Donhwamun is the east palace gate, which was built in 1412. It’s the oldest remaining gate among the five major palaces in Seoul. It’s the two-story pavilion, which makes it the largest palace gate. A nine-ton bell was hung with a huge drum on the second floor of it. The drum was strung 33 times at 4am, and at 10pm the bell rung 28 times.

Chinese Scholar Tree

Following the legend of China, people planted three Chinese scholar trees in the palace. They symbolized the Korean top officials. People believed these trees would protect the palace against evil spirits.

Injeongjeon

Injeongjeon is the throne hall. It is the main hall where the formal events like coronation were held. Also here was the place kings received foreign visitors.

Seonjeongjeon

This is the building where the king spent most of his time doing his daily work.  Also, it’s the only building with the blue-tiled roof, which was much more expensive than others. Some important events like funerals were held here.

Huijeongdang

Huijeongdang was the king’s sleeping chamber. He did some works here.

Daejojeon

Daejojeon was the queen’s sleeping chamber. In some ways, the queen’s residence was more important than the king’s because she had to stay there all the time. Therefore, Daejojeon was built very beautiful.

The buildings of Huijeongdang and Daejojeon we can see these days are not the original ones. After the original buildings were burned in 1917, Japanese moved Kyotaejeon and Kangnyeongjeon from Gyeongbok Palace. And then they assembled it. In the process, the inner part was changed into western style.

Seongjeonggak

The Seongjeonggak area was the main palace for Crown Prince Hyomyeong the son of King Sunjo.  It’s a six-sided pavilion and had a large collection of books. Japanese used this building as a hospital during their occupation (in the 20th century).

Seonwonjeon

This is the area where religious ceremonies were held. The portraits of former kings were enshrined and some ancestral rites were performed here.

Nakseonjae

Nakseonjae is the complex of three buildings built by King Heonjong in1847. The buildings include the king’s dwelling, a library, a villa for his concubine Lady Kim, and a residence for the Queen mother. The king built them to show his love for art and Lady Kim.

Seokbokheon

IT was built in hope for a son.(But King Heonjong never had a son)



Written, picture by Isabelle of KCC.



※ KCC is the club which is made to introduce foreigners about Korea and its culture.Twitter Facebook Page Facebook account

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